Foreigners share their opinions on China’s transformation

//Foreigners share their opinions on China’s transformation

Foreigners share their opinions on China’s transformation

American men Charlie Erickson, Jay Thornhill and Tyler McNew creating an e-commerce website called Baopals, which navigates Alibaba’s Taobao and Tmall in English translation, are seen on the rooftop of a building against the skyline of the Shanghai Tower, the Shanghai World Financial Center, the Oriental Pearl TV Tower and other high-rise buildings and skyscrapers in Shanghai, China, 9 August 2017.

About 800,000 foreigners living in China have experienced both the hardships and benefits of the country’s development. A look at China through their eyes provides insights into how the nation has been transformed and what it can offer the world.

An American in Xiamen

In 1988, William Brown, an MBA professor at Xiamen University, moved to Xiamen, a coastal garden city in east China’s Fujian Province, with his wife and two sons.

“I chose Xiamen University because it was the only university that allowed foreigners to take their families with them to learn Chinese at that time,” he said.

The Brown family flew from California to Hong Kong, where they took a grueling 18-hour boat ride to reach the coastal city.

Brown said he has witnessed China change from being “really backward” to moderately prosperous over 30 years.

In addition to teaching, he has developed English websites and published more than 10 English books about Xiamen.

Brown said he was excited when he once walked into a bookstore and saw several young students reading his books with a dictionary in their hands.

“The young people love their city and want to know a foreigner’s perspective on it,” he said.

This inspired him to publish the Chinese edition of the book “Discover Gulangyu.” This small island in Xiamen entered the UNESCO world heritage list in July this year for its cultural history and historic buildings.

“Only when the youth understand history can they walk into the future,” he said.

He was excited when the city of Xiamen hosted the BRICS summit from September 3 to 5.

“The G7 and G20 are the past, while BRICS is the future,” he said.

He said it is right that China has put forward the concept of “BRICS Plus” by inviting Egypt, Mexico, Thailand, Tajikistan and Guinea for dialogue.

A Korean in Hefei

When Korean teacher Cho Sung Hye landed in Hefei, capital of east China’s Anhui Province, in 1996, she had no idea she would be staying for so long. In 2006, she became the first person from South Korea to get China’s “green card” for permanent residence.

“None of my friends back home knew where Hefei was in China, and there was not a single foreigner that I could find in the city,” Cho said in fluent Chinese.

She remembered that 1996 was just four years after the late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping made a series of landmark speeches marking China’s opening up and modernization.

There were only eight students in her Korean language class, which was held in the smallest classroom in Hefei College. Now the school has four Korean major classes, enrolling 500 students a year.

Over the past 20 years, Cho has seen 3,500 of her students go to South Korea for further studies.

She said it is the students’ thirst for learning that inspires her.

“Even at that time, I could feel China’s shining vigor and that it was on the way to rejuvenation into a great international power,” she said.

In 2016 the 57-year-old woman started a cultural exchange business that recruits international talent to Anhui.

“China’s wheel of development won’t stop rolling. Too many foreign people that I know are eager to study, work and live here,” she said.

A Japanese in Beijing

Toshio Fukuda, a Japanese nano-tech scientist, made his first visit to Beijing in 1995, attending a manufacturing technology summit at the invitation of China’s Ministry of Science and Technology.

Since then, his ties with China have continued, teaching as a visiting professor in a number of China’s high-tech institutions. In 2000, he decided to base all of his research work at Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) and has been there ever since.

“As a scientist, I want the micro-nano field to grow bigger and deeper, no matter where my research is based,” he said.

He said that Chinese people are very hard-working. When he first came to China, the only computer integrated manufacturing was in a lab at Tsinghua University.

“The Chinese government did not have a lot of funding, but it funded Tsinghua’s research,” he said.

By 2000, he could see that research into robotic technology was spreading to science institutes all over China.

Fukuda said he chose BIT as his base because of the research environment, and because the National Science Foundation provided funding for his work.

China is his home now, and many people tell him that he is already half-Chinese. His favorite food is hot-pot, a spicy Sichuan-style food, and his youngest daughter also speaks Chinese.

2017-10-23T16:02:20+00:00

Leave A Comment

Protected with IP Blacklist CloudIP Blacklist Cloud

Foreigners share their opinions on China’s transformation

American men Charlie Erickson, Jay Thornhill and Tyler McNew creating an e-commerce website called Baopals, which navigates Alibaba’s Taobao and Tmall in English translation, are seen on the rooftop of a building against the skyline of the Shanghai Tower, the Shanghai World Financial Center, the Oriental Pearl TV Tower and other high-rise buildings and skyscrapers in Shanghai, China, 9 August 2017.

About 800,000 foreigners living in China have experienced both the hardships and benefits of the country’s development. A look at China through their eyes provides insights into how the nation has been transformed and what it can offer the world.

An American in Xiamen

In 1988, William Brown, an MBA professor at Xiamen University, moved to Xiamen, a coastal garden city in east China’s Fujian Province, with his wife and two sons.

“I chose Xiamen University because it was the only university that allowed foreigners to take their families with them to learn Chinese at that time,” he said.

The Brown family flew from California to Hong Kong, where they took a grueling 18-hour boat ride to reach the coastal city.

Brown said he has witnessed China change from being “really backward” to moderately prosperous over 30 years.

In addition to teaching, he has developed English websites and published more than 10 English books about Xiamen.

Brown said he was excited when he once walked into a bookstore and saw several young students reading his books with a dictionary in their hands.

“The young people love their city and want to know a foreigner’s perspective on it,” he said.

This inspired him to publish the Chinese edition of the book “Discover Gulangyu.” This small island in Xiamen entered the UNESCO world heritage list in July this year for its cultural history and historic buildings.

“Only when the youth understand history can they walk into the future,” he said.

He was excited when the city of Xiamen hosted the BRICS summit from September 3 to 5.

“The G7 and G20 are the past, while BRICS is the future,” he said.

He said it is right that China has put forward the concept of “BRICS Plus” by inviting Egypt, Mexico, Thailand, Tajikistan and Guinea for dialogue.

A Korean in Hefei

When Korean teacher Cho Sung Hye landed in Hefei, capital of east China’s Anhui Province, in 1996, she had no idea she would be staying for so long. In 2006, she became the first person from South Korea to get China’s “green card” for permanent residence.

“None of my friends back home knew where Hefei was in China, and there was not a single foreigner that I could find in the city,” Cho said in fluent Chinese.

She remembered that 1996 was just four years after the late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping made a series of landmark speeches marking China’s opening up and modernization.

There were only eight students in her Korean language class, which was held in the smallest classroom in Hefei College. Now the school has four Korean major classes, enrolling 500 students a year.

Over the past 20 years, Cho has seen 3,500 of her students go to South Korea for further studies.

She said it is the students’ thirst for learning that inspires her.

“Even at that time, I could feel China’s shining vigor and that it was on the way to rejuvenation into a great international power,” she said.

In 2016 the 57-year-old woman started a cultural exchange business that recruits international talent to Anhui.

“China’s wheel of development won’t stop rolling. Too many foreign people that I know are eager to study, work and live here,” she said.

A Japanese in Beijing

Toshio Fukuda, a Japanese nano-tech scientist, made his first visit to Beijing in 1995, attending a manufacturing technology summit at the invitation of China’s Ministry of Science and Technology.

Since then, his ties with China have continued, teaching as a visiting professor in a number of China’s high-tech institutions. In 2000, he decided to base all of his research work at Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) and has been there ever since.

“As a scientist, I want the micro-nano field to grow bigger and deeper, no matter where my research is based,” he said.

He said that Chinese people are very hard-working. When he first came to China, the only computer integrated manufacturing was in a lab at Tsinghua University.

“The Chinese government did not have a lot of funding, but it funded Tsinghua’s research,” he said.

By 2000, he could see that research into robotic technology was spreading to science institutes all over China.

Fukuda said he chose BIT as his base because of the research environment, and because the National Science Foundation provided funding for his work.

China is his home now, and many people tell him that he is already half-Chinese. His favorite food is hot-pot, a spicy Sichuan-style food, and his youngest daughter also speaks Chinese.

2017-11-10T15:56:04+00:00

Leave A Comment

Protected with IP Blacklist CloudIP Blacklist Cloud

Les étrangers partagent leurs opinions sur la transformation de la Chine

Les hommes américains Charlie Erickson, Jay Thornhill et Tyler McNew créent un site de commerce électronique appelé Baopals, qui navigue entre Taobao et Tmall d’Alibaba en traduction anglaise, sur le toit d’un immeuble contre l’horizon de la tour de Shanghai, le centre financier mondial de Shanghai. , la tour de télévision Oriental Pearl et d’autres tours et gratte-ciels à Shanghai, en Chine, le 9 août 2017.

Environ 800 000 étrangers vivant en Chine ont connu à la fois les difficultés et les avantages du développement du pays. Un regard sur la Chine à travers leurs yeux permet de comprendre comment la nation a été transformée et ce qu’elle peut offrir au monde.

Un Américain à Xiamen

En 1988, William Brown, professeur de MBA à l’Université de Xiamen, a déménagé à Xiamen, une ville côtière dans la province du Fujian, avec sa femme et ses deux fils.

“J’ai choisi l’Université de Xiamen parce que c’était la seule université qui permettait aux étrangers d’emmener leurs familles avec eux pour apprendre le chinois à cette époque”, a-t-il dit.

La famille Brown a volé de la Californie à Hong Kong, où ils ont pris un bateau exténuant de 18 heures pour atteindre la ville côtière.

Brown a dit qu’il a vu la Chine passer de “vraiment arriéré” à modérément prospère pendant 30 ans.

En plus d’enseigner, il a développé des sites Web en anglais et publié plus de 10 livres en anglais sur Xiamen.

Brown a dit qu’il était excité quand il est entré dans une librairie et a vu plusieurs jeunes étudiants lire ses livres avec un dictionnaire dans leurs mains.

“Les jeunes aiment leur ville et veulent connaître le point de vue d’un étranger”, a-t-il déclaré.

Cela l’a inspiré à publier l’édition chinoise du livre “Discover Gulangyu”. Cette petite île de Xiamen est entrée sur la liste du patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO en juillet de cette année pour son histoire culturelle et ses bâtiments historiques.

«Ce n’est que lorsque les jeunes comprennent l’histoire qu’ils peuvent marcher vers l’avenir», a-t-il dit.

Il était excité lorsque la ville de Xiamen a accueilli le sommet BRICS du 3 au 5 septembre.

“Le G7 et le G20 sont le passé, tandis que les BRICS sont l’avenir”, a-t-il déclaré.

Il a dit qu’il est juste que la Chine ait mis en avant le concept de “BRICS Plus” en invitant l’Egypte, le Mexique, la Thaïlande, le Tadjikistan et la Guinée au dialogue.

Un Coréen à Hefei

Lorsque le professeur coréen Cho Sung Hye a atterri à Hefei, capitale de la province de l’Anhui en Chine orientale, en 1996, elle n’avait aucune idée qu’elle resterait si longtemps. En 2006, elle est devenue la première personne de Corée du Sud à obtenir la «carte verte» de la Chine pour la résidence permanente.

“Aucun de mes amis à la maison ne savait où se trouvait Hefei en Chine, et il n’y avait pas un seul étranger que je pouvais trouver dans la ville”, a déclaré Cho en chinois courant.

Elle s’est souvenue que 1996 était seulement quatre ans après que le défunt dirigeant chinois Deng Xiaoping ait fait une série de discours marquants marquant l’ouverture et la modernisation de la Chine.

Il n’y avait que huit étudiants dans sa classe de langue coréenne, qui se déroulait dans la plus petite salle de classe du Hefei College. Maintenant l’école a quatre grandes classes coréennes, en inscrivant 500 étudiants par an.

Au cours des 20 dernières années, Cho a vu 3 500 de ses étudiants aller en Corée du Sud pour poursuivre leurs études.

Elle a dit que c’est la soif d’apprentissage des élèves qui l’inspire.

“Même à ce moment-là, je pouvais sentir la vigueur de la Chine et qu’elle était en voie de rajeunissement en une grande puissance internationale”, a-t-elle déclaré.

En 2016, la femme de 57 ans a lancé une entreprise d’échange culturel qui recrute des talents internationaux à Anhui.

“La roue du développement de la Chine ne cessera pas de rouler: trop d’étrangers que je connais sont désireux d’étudier, de travailler et de vivre ici”, a-t-elle déclaré.

Un japonais à Pékin

Toshio Fukuda, un scientifique japonais de la nanotechnologie, a fait sa première visite à Beijing en 1995, participant à un sommet sur les technologies de fabrication à l’invitation du ministère chinois des Sciences et de la Technologie.

Depuis lors, ses relations avec la Chine se sont poursuivies, en tant que professeur invité dans un certain nombre d’institutions chinoises de haute technologie. En 2000, il a décidé de fonder tous ses travaux de recherche à l’Institut de Technologie de Beijing (BIT) et il est là depuis.

«En tant que scientifique, je veux que le domaine des micro-nanotechnologies grandisse de plus en plus, peu importe où se situe ma recherche», a-t-il déclaré.

Il a dit que les Chinois travaillent très dur. Quand il est arrivé en Chine, la seule fabrication intégrée par ordinateur était dans un laboratoire à l’université de Tsinghua.

“Le gouvernement chinois n’a pas eu beaucoup de financement, mais il a financé la recherche de Tsinghua”, a-t-il dit.

En 2000, il pouvait voir que la recherche sur la technologie robotique s’étendait aux instituts scientifiques de toute la Chine.

Fukuda a dit qu’il a choisi BIT comme base en raison de l’environnement de recherche, et parce que la National Science Foundation a fourni le financement pour son travail.

La Chine est sa maison maintenant, et beaucoup de gens lui disent qu’il est déjà à moitié chinois. Sa nourriture préférée est le pot-au-feu, un aliment épicé du Sichuan, et sa plus jeune fille parle aussi chinois.

2017-11-21T22:17:58+00:00

Leave A Comment

Protected with IP Blacklist CloudIP Blacklist Cloud

Ausländer teilen ihre Meinung über Chinas Transformation

Die amerikanischen Männer Charlie Erickson, Jay Thornhill und Tyler McNew, die eine E-Commerce-Website namens Baopals erstellen, die auf Taibao und Tmall von Alibaba in englischer Übersetzung navigiert, sind auf dem Dach eines Gebäudes vor der Skyline des Shanghai Tower zu sehen. , der Oriental Pearl TV Tower und andere Hochhäuser und Wolkenkratzer in Shanghai, China, 9. August 2017.

Etwa 800.000 Ausländer, die in China leben, haben sowohl die Strapazen als auch die Vorteile der Entwicklung des Landes erlebt. Ein Blick auf China durch ihre Augen gibt Einblicke in die Transformation der Nation und ihre Möglichkeiten für die Welt.

Ein Amerikaner in Xiamen

Im Jahr 1988 zog William Brown, ein MBA-Professor an der Universität Xiamen, mit seiner Frau und zwei Söhnen nach Xiamen, einer Küstenstadt in der ostchinesischen Provinz Fujian.

“Ich entschied mich für die Universität von Xiamen, weil es die einzige Universität war, die es Ausländern erlaubte, ihre Familien mitzunehmen, um zu dieser Zeit Chinesisch zu lernen”, sagte er.

Die Familie Brown flog von Kalifornien nach Hongkong, wo sie eine zermürbende 18-stündige Bootsfahrt unternahmen, um die Küstenstadt zu erreichen.

Brown sagte, er habe erlebt, dass China sich in den letzten 30 Jahren von “wirklich rückständig” zu einem moderaten Wohlstand entwickelt habe.

Neben dem Unterrichten hat er englische Websites entwickelt und mehr als 10 englische Bücher über Xiamen veröffentlicht.

Brown sagte, er sei aufgeregt, als er einmal in eine Buchhandlung kam und sah, wie mehrere junge Schüler seine Bücher mit einem Wörterbuch in ihren Händen lasen.

“Die jungen Leute lieben ihre Stadt und wollen die Perspektive eines Ausländers kennen”, sagte er.

Dies inspirierte ihn, die chinesische Ausgabe des Buches “Discover Gulangyu” zu veröffentlichen. Diese kleine Insel in Xiamen wurde im Juli dieses Jahres von der UNESCO als Weltkulturerbe für ihre Kulturgeschichte und ihre historischen Gebäude eingestuft.

“Nur wenn die Jugend Geschichte versteht, können sie in die Zukunft gehen”, sagte er.

Er war begeistert, als die Stadt Xiamen vom 3. bis 5. September Gastgeber des BRICS-Gipfels war.

“Die G7 und G20 sind Vergangenheit, während BRICS die Zukunft ist”, sagte er.

Er sagte, es sei richtig, dass China das Konzept “BRICS Plus” vorgebracht habe, indem es Ägypten, Mexiko, Thailand, Tadschikistan und Guinea zum Dialog einlade.

Ein Koreaner in Hefei

Als die koreanische Lehrerin Cho Sung Hye 1996 in Hefei, der Hauptstadt der ostchinesischen Provinz Anhui, landete, hatte sie keine Ahnung, dass sie so lange bleiben würde. Im Jahr 2006 wurde sie die erste Person aus Südkorea, die Chinas “Green Card” für einen dauerhaften Wohnsitz erhielt.

“Keiner meiner Freunde zu Hause wusste, wo Hefei in China war, und es gab keinen einzigen Ausländer, den ich in der Stadt finden konnte”, sagte Cho in fließendem Chinesisch.

Sie erinnerte sich, dass 1996 nur vier Jahre vergangen waren, nachdem der verstorbene chinesische Staatschef Deng Xiaoping eine Reihe bedeutender Reden gehalten hatte, die die Öffnung und Modernisierung Chinas markierten.

Es gab nur acht Schüler in ihrem koreanischen Sprachkurs, der im kleinsten Klassenzimmer im Hefei College abgehalten wurde. Jetzt hat die Schule vier koreanische Hauptklassen, in denen 500 Schüler pro Jahr eingeschrieben sind.

In den letzten 20 Jahren hat Cho 3.500 ihrer Schüler für weitere Studien nach Südkorea geschickt.

Sie sagte, es sei der Lerndurst der Schüler, der sie inspiriert.

“Schon damals konnte ich Chinas strahlende Energie spüren und dass es auf dem Weg der Verjüngung zu einer großen internationalen Macht war”, sagte sie.

Im Jahr 2016 gründete die 57-jährige Frau ein Kulturaustausch-Unternehmen, das internationale Talente nach Anhui rekrutiert.

“Chinas Rad der Entwicklung wird nicht aufhören zu rollen. Zu viele fremde Leute, die ich kenne, sind begierig, hier zu studieren, zu arbeiten und zu leben,” sagte sie.

Ein Japaner in Peking

Toshio Fukuda, ein japanischer Nano-Tech-Wissenschaftler, machte 1995 seinen ersten Besuch in Peking, als er auf Einladung des chinesischen Ministeriums für Wissenschaft und Technologie an einem Gipfeltreffen zur Herstellungstechnologie teilnahm.

Seitdem hat er seine Beziehungen zu China weitergeführt und unterrichtet als Gastprofessor in einer Reihe von Chinas High-Tech-Institutionen. Im Jahr 2000 entschloss er sich, seine gesamte Forschungsarbeit am Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) zu verwirklichen und ist seitdem dort.

“Als Wissenschaftler möchte ich, dass das Mikronano-Feld immer größer und tiefer wird, egal wo meine Forschung basiert”, sagte er.

Er sagte, dass die Chinesen sehr fleißig sind. Als er zum ersten Mal nach China kam, war die einzige computerintegrierte Fertigung in einem Labor an der Tsinghua Universität.

“Die chinesische Regierung hatte nicht viel Geld, aber sie finanzierte Tsinghua’s Forschung”, sagte er.

Im Jahr 2000 konnte er feststellen, dass sich die Forschung in der Robotertechnik auf Wissenschaftsinstitute in ganz China ausbreitete.

Fukuda sagte, dass er BIT als seine Basis wegen der Forschungsumwelt wählte, und weil die nationale wissenschaftliche Grundlage Finanzierung für seine Arbeit zur Verfügung stellte.

China ist jetzt sein Zuhause, und viele Leute sagen ihm, dass er schon halb Chineser ist. Sein Lieblingsessen ist Hot-Pot, ein würziges Essen im Sichuan-Stil, und seine jüngste Tochter spricht auch Chinesisch.

2017-11-22T01:01:48+00:00

Leave A Comment

Protected with IP Blacklist CloudIP Blacklist Cloud

New Courses

Contact Info

1600 Amphitheatre Parkway New York WC1 1BA

Phone: 1.800.458.556 / 1.800.532.2112

Fax: 458 761-9562

Web: ThemeFusion

Recent Posts